DEED Awards $3.57 Million for Redevelopment Projects

DEED Awards $3.57 Million for Redevelopment Projects
July 9, 2015 TCYIMBY Editorial Team

Redevelopment projects that will create or retain 464 jobs have been approved for cleanup funding from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED). 

DEED awarded $3.57 million from its Contamination Cleanup and Investigation Grant Program for 13 projects in the state. The funding will help pay for cleaning up or investigating pollution on those sites. Housing, office and retail space, hotels and schools are among the projects planned. 

“The Contamination Cleanup and Investigation Grant Program is one of Minnesota’s most effective and successful redevelopment tools,” said DEED Commissioner Katie Clark Sieben. “Since the inception of this program in 1995, more than 45,000 jobs have been created or retained and thousands of acres of land reclaimed for redevelopment projects.”

DEED cleanup grants, which are awarded twice a year, account for about 75 percent of funding used for reclaiming polluted sites and brownfields statewide. The remaining 25 percent comes from the Metropolitan Council, cities, counties, other local units of government, private landowners and developers. 

DEED’s Contamination Cleanup and Investigation Grant Program has awarded 440 grants worth over $151 million since the program’s inception. Thanks to the funding, 3,261 acres of contaminated property have been reclaimed for development projects, resulting in 21,145 new jobs and 24,305 retained jobs. The program has attracted $4.8 billion in private investments and $96 million in new tax revenue.

More details about the program are available here. 

The following is a breakdown of the latest round of funding: 

Mankato, Civic Center Expansion, $289,492
Mankato was awarded $289,492 in cleanup funding for this 1.2-acre site polluted with petroleum, metals and other contaminants. A dry cleaner and auto repair garage were on the site previously. A 60,033-square-foot expansion of the neighboring Mankato Civic Center is planned on the site. The project will create 10 new jobs. Matching costs will be paid by the city.

Minneapolis, 700 Central Ave., $644,411
Minneapolis was approved for $644,411 in cleanup funding for this 0.96-acre site polluted with petroleum, metals and other contaminants. The site previously was used for furniture finishing and storage. Redevelopment plans call for restoring two existing buildings for a mixed-use development offering 60 residential units and 10,000 square feet of commercial space. The project will create 20 jobs and increase the tax base by $189,740. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.

Minneapolis, AC Hotel, $252,939
Minneapolis received $252,939 in cleanup funding for this 0.53-acre site polluted with metals and other contaminants. Previous uses of the site include a hotel, movie theater, tailor shop, barber shop, restaurant and surface parking. A nine-story hotel offering 245 rooms and a street-level restaurant are planned. The project will create 61 jobs and increase the tax base by $916,938. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.

Minneapolis, The Encore, $225,000
Minneapolis was awarded $225,000 in cleanup funding for this 0.72-acre site polluted with metals and other contaminants. The site, which previously was used for industrial purposes, will be redeveloped into an 11-story apartment building offering 123 apartments and three levels of underground parking. The project will create two jobs and increase the tax base by $678,678. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.

Minneapolis, Huron Hotel, $270,678
Minneapolis was approved for $270,678 in cleanup funding for this 0.84-acre site polluted with petroleum, metals and other contaminants. The site previously was used for manufacturing, railroad activities and, most recently, for making chow mein noodles. A five-story hotel with 168 rooms is planned. The project will create 40 jobs and increase the tax base by $380,221. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.

Minneapolis, North Loop Commons, $130,977 

Minneapolis received $130,977 in cleanup funding for this 3.12-acre site polluted with petroleum and other contaminants. Previous uses include residential, industrial, office, warehousing, distribution, vehicle maintenance and fuel storage. An existing 68,000-square-foot building will be renovated for use as a charter school and office and retail space. The project will create 70 jobs and increase the tax base by $270,935. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources. 

Minneapolis, Superior Plating, $714,273 
Minneapolis was awarded $714,273 in additional cleanup funding for this 2.85-acre site polluted with metals and other contaminants. These funds will supplement the $933,083 award in June 2014 for the East Side Station project. Formerly occupied by an electroplating company, the site will be redeveloped into a 20-story residential tower surrounded by a four-story structure. The development will offer 278 apartments, 22,000 square feet of commercial space and three levels of parking. The project will create 75 jobs and increase the tax base by $1,277,807. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.

St. Louis Park, Shoreham, $625,075
St. Louis Park received $625,075 in cleanup funding for this 2.23-acre site polluted with petroleum and other contaminants. The site previously held a mix of commercial and residential space. Officials plan to build a 150-unit, mixed-use apartment building that will include 20,000 square feet of commercial space for a clinic. The project will create 54 jobs and increase the tax base by $480,318. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.

St. Paul, Former Schmidt Keg House, $110,478
St. Paul was awarded $110,478 in cleanup funding for this 1.89-acre site polluted with petroleum and other contaminants. The site previously was used for ethanol manufacturing, a gas station, a lumber yard and various brewing operations. Plans call for redeveloping the Schmidt Keg House into a restaurant and farmers market. The project will create 35 jobs. Matching costs will be paid by the developer and other grant sources.

St. Paul, Gross Given, $72,735
St. Paul was approved for $72,735 in cleanup funding for this 5.04-acre site polluted with petroleum, metals and other contaminants. Previous uses of the site include a lumberyard, dry cleaner, lead pipe manufacturer, tool and die manufacturer, metal fabricating and vending machine manufacturing. An existing 189,000-square-foot building will be renovated for warehouse, distribution and light manufacturing operations. The project will create 10 jobs and increase the tax base by $23,348. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.

St. Paul, Twin Cities Academy, $199,000 

St. Paul was awarded $199,000 in cleanup funding for this 9.24-acre site contaminated with petroleum and metals. Formerly used to manufacture cement blocks and ready-mix concrete, the site will be redeveloped into a 60,000-square-foot charter school (grades 6-12). The project will create five jobs and retain 51 jobs. Matching costs will be paid by the developer.

Silver Bay, Northwoods Express, $20,440
Silver Bay was awarded $20,440 in investigation funding for this 0.38-acre site. The site, which was formerly used as a gas station, will be redeveloped into two commercial buildings. The project will create eight jobs and increase the tax base by $6,070. Matching costs will be paid by the developer. 

Vadnais Heights, Vadnais Market, $11,250 
Vadnais Heights received $11,250 in additional investigation funding for this 3.25-acre site. These funds will supplement the $17,512 award made in December 2014 for the Garceau Hardware project. The site, previously used as a gas station, auto repair garage, hardware store, grocery store and restaurant, will be redeveloped into a 124-unit senior living facility. The project will create 23 jobs and increase the tax base by $301,948. Matching costs will be paid by the city.

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